Caresse Crosby: From Black Sun to Roccasinibalda by Anne Conover

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Caresse Crosby: From Black Sun to Roccasinibalda

'“Caresse Crosby is probably one of the least recognizable of all the names remembered from literary and artistic circles on 1920s Paris, yet her life touched the most promising and gifted artists of a generation. Idealist, poet, friend, lover, and muse, Crosby deserves to be remembered. Anne Conover has unearthed a gem with her account of this free-spirited and flamboyant woman—ahead of her time, she was a woman who endured, often spectacularly.” —William Clair, Voyages“Called by Anaïs Nin ‘a pollen carrier, who mixed, stirred, brewed, and concocted friendships,’ Crosby is best known as an expatriate in 1920s Paris who, with her husband Harry, founded Black Sun Press. Their life in Paris has already been chronicled in Geoffrey Wolff’s Black Sun (1976), which stops with Harry’s suicide in 1929. Conover concentrates on the following 41 years of Crosby’s life as poet, publisher, and social activist. —Library Journal 1989   “This admiring biography follows the life of the American beauty who invented the brassiere to wear at her New York society debut in 1910. Divorced from an alcohol-prone husband by whom she had two children, Mary Phelps Jacob married Harry Crosby, who gave her the pen-name ‘Caresse’ and with whom she lived in Paris, wrote poetry and published Joyce, Eliot and Pound through their Black Sun Press. After Harry killed himself, Caresse went on to establish a gallery of modern art in wartime Washington, published a literary magazine, espoused the cause of world citizenship, and became ‘principessa’ of a 72-room ruined castle outside Rome for young literati with limited funds.” —Publishers Weekly 1989 “Caresse Crosby is probably one of the least recognizable of all the names remembered from literary and artistic circles on 1920s Paris, yet her life touched the most promising and gifted artists of a generation. Idealist, poet, friend, lover, and muse, Crosby deserves to be remembered. Anne Conover has unearthed a gem with her account of this free-spirited and flamboyant woman—ahead of her time, she was a woman who endured, often spectacularly.” —William Clair, Voyages'
'“Caresse Crosby is probably one of the least recognizable of all the names remembered from literary and artistic circles on 1920s Paris, yet her life touched the most promising and gifted artists of a generation. Idealist, poet, friend, lover, and muse, Crosby deserves to be remembered. Anne Conover has unearthed a gem with her account of this free-spirited and flamboyant woman—ahead of her time, she was a woman who endured, often spectacularly.” —William Clair, Voyages“Called by Anaïs Nin ‘a pollen carrier, who mixed, stirred, brewed, and concocted friendships,’ Crosby is best known as an expatriate in 1920s Paris who, with her husband Harry, founded Black Sun Press. Their life in Paris has already been chronicled in Geoffrey Wolff’s Black Sun (1976), which stops with Harry’s suicide in 1929. Conover concentrates on the following 41 years of Crosby’s life as poet, publisher, and social activist. —Library Journal 1989   “This admiring biography follows the life of the American beauty who invented the brassiere to wear at her New York society debut in 1910. Divorced from an alcohol-prone husband by whom she had two children, Mary Phelps Jacob married Harry Crosby, who gave her the pen-name ‘Caresse’ and with whom she lived in Paris, wrote poetry and published Joyce, Eliot and Pound through their Black Sun Press. After Harry killed himself, Caresse went on to establish a gallery of modern art in wartime Washington, published a literary magazine, espoused the cause of world citizenship, and became ‘principessa’ of a 72-room ruined castle outside Rome for young literati with limited funds.” —Publishers Weekly 1989 “Caresse Crosby is probably one of the least recognizable of all the names remembered from literary and artistic circles on 1920s Paris, yet her life touched the most promising and gifted artists of a generation. Idealist, poet, friend, lover, and muse, Crosby deserves to be remembered. Anne Conover has unearthed a gem with her account of this free-spirited and flamboyant woman—ahead of her time, she was a woman who endured, often spectacularly.” —William Clair, Voyages'
Publisher: Open Road Distribution ISBN: 9781504040662 Pages: 285