Slouching Towards Bethlehem: Essays by Joan Didion

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Slouching Towards Bethlehem: Essays

'“In her portraits of people, [Didion] is not out to expose but to understand, and she shows us actors and millionaires, doomed brides and naïve acid-trippers, left-wing ideologues and snobs of the Hawaiian aristocracy in a way that makes them neither villainous nor glamorous, but alive and botched and often mournfully beautiful.” —Dan Wakefield, The New York Times Book Review   “Superb . . . brilliant.” —Los Angeles Times   “Didion’s essays of a world featuring barricades and bombings, mass murders and kidnapped heiresses make recent history as filtered through her seem a savage and passionate drama, something you can put a hand on and feel it beating, something you can put your ear to and hear its story.” —The Village Voice   “Arriving one year after the Summer of Love, the book, and its title essay, firmly punctured the pervasive myths about the counterculture. . . . One of the most compelling books about ’60s America.” —Time   “Startling . . . She can strike at the heart, or the absurdity of a matter in our contemporary wasteland with quick, graceful strokes.” —William Hogan, San Francisco Chronicle   “The story between the lines of Slouching Towards Bethlehem is surely not so much ‘California’ as it is [Didion’s] ability to make us share her passionate sense of it.” —Alfred Kazin  Praise for Joan Didion “She is one of the very few writers of our time who approaches her terrible subject with absolute seriousness, with fear and humility and awe. . . . She has been an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time, a memorable voice, partly eulogistic, partly despairing; always in control.” —Joyce Carol Oates, The New York Times Book Review   “A slant vision that is arresting and unique . . . Didion might be an observer from another planet—one so edgy and alert that she ends up knowing more about our own world than we know ourselves.” —Anne Tyler   “Many of us have tried, and failed, to master [Didion’s] gift for the single ordinary deflating word, the word that spins an otherwise flat sentence through five degrees of irony. But her sentences could only be hers.” —Chicago Tribune  '
'“In her portraits of people, [Didion] is not out to expose but to understand, and she shows us actors and millionaires, doomed brides and naïve acid-trippers, left-wing ideologues and snobs of the Hawaiian aristocracy in a way that makes them neither villainous nor glamorous, but alive and botched and often mournfully beautiful.” —Dan Wakefield, The New York Times Book Review   “Superb . . . brilliant.” —Los Angeles Times   “Didion’s essays of a world featuring barricades and bombings, mass murders and kidnapped heiresses make recent history as filtered through her seem a savage and passionate drama, something you can put a hand on and feel it beating, something you can put your ear to and hear its story.” —The Village Voice   “Arriving one year after the Summer of Love, the book, and its title essay, firmly punctured the pervasive myths about the counterculture. . . . One of the most compelling books about ’60s America.” —Time   “Startling . . . She can strike at the heart, or the absurdity of a matter in our contemporary wasteland with quick, graceful strokes.” —William Hogan, San Francisco Chronicle   “The story between the lines of Slouching Towards Bethlehem is surely not so much ‘California’ as it is [Didion’s] ability to make us share her passionate sense of it.” —Alfred Kazin  Praise for Joan Didion “She is one of the very few writers of our time who approaches her terrible subject with absolute seriousness, with fear and humility and awe. . . . She has been an articulate witness to the most stubborn and intractable truths of our time, a memorable voice, partly eulogistic, partly despairing; always in control.” —Joyce Carol Oates, The New York Times Book Review   “A slant vision that is arresting and unique . . . Didion might be an observer from another planet—one so edgy and alert that she ends up knowing more about our own world than we know ourselves.” —Anne Tyler   “Many of us have tried, and failed, to master [Didion’s] gift for the single ordinary deflating word, the word that spins an otherwise flat sentence through five degrees of irony. But her sentences could only be hers.” —Chicago Tribune  '
Publisher: Open Road Media ISBN: 9781504045650 Pages: 361